No, French hospitals are not using mannequins as fake Covid-19 patient…

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Since early January, some people online have been sharing a photo of a dummy in a hospital bed, claiming it was used in a TV report by French broadcaster BFM in order to trick people about the severity of the latest wave of Covid in France. They say that hospitals aren’t really complete, and that they’re packing beds with mannequins to make the situation seem worse. But in reality, these images come from a hospital simulation in Quebec, and they were never aired on BFMTV.

“France: hospitals are so saturated with the omicron variant that there is not already time to put the arms to the mannequins for the media…” This was the caption above an image shared on an anti-vaccine Facebook page on January 6.

The photo shows a mannequin, laying on a hospital bed, separated from the medical team by a protective obstacle. On the top left of the image, there’s the logo for French news channel BFMTV, and on the bottom a banner saying “Castex tested positive for Covid-19”, referring to the French chief minister’s positive diagnosis on November 22, 2021.


The photo has been circulating on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in English, in addition as in Portuguese and Polish.

Posts like these had already been debunked by French media, like AFP Factuel, but began spreading again, this time for an international audience in various languages. 

A demonstration video in a Quebec hospital

As explained by AFP Factuel, the original image can be found with a reverse image search using the search engine Yandex. The photo of the mannequin appears online without the BFM logo. Other images show the same scene, from another angle, with a logo saying “Quebec”.

Capture d’écran du reportage de Radio Canada du 17 avril 2020, dont est issue l’image publiée avec la fausse affirmation. Le reportage montre une simulation de prise en charge d’un patient à l’aide de mannequins
Capture d’écran du reportage de Radio Canada du 17 avril 2020, dont est issue l’image publiée avec la fausse affirmation. Le reportage montre une simulation de prise en charge d’un patient à l’aide de mannequins © Observateurs Radio Canada

You can then do a keyword search with the words “Covid”, “mannequin” and “Quebec” to find an article from Radio Canada on October 8, 2021, which explains the context.

The article says that the photo in question comes from a Radio Canada report broadcast on April 17, 2020, titled “At the heart of a Covid-19 hospital”. It was taken at the University Institute of Cardiology and Pulmonology in Quebec. The report shows the protocol given to Covid patients in emergency situations, using dummies for a simulation.

At the beginning of the clip, the journalists asks a doctor why they are only seeing a simulation: “Doctor Simon, when you go by the doors, when you find yourself in the Covid zone, what do you find, what does it look like, we haven’t seen that however?”

Mathieu Simon, head of the institute’s intensive care unit replies, “I couldn’t take you there to protect you, clearly, when you go by the Covid zone, you mainly see very dedicated staff.”

A photo edited to look like a BFMTV report

Why does the image appear with what looks like the interface of a BFMTV report, with the time at the top left, and the banner at the bottom?

A forensic examination with the InVid WeVerify tool (click here to find out how), allows us to clarify a difference in pixels where the BFMTV banner and logo appear. 

These inconsistencies between the photo of the mannequin and the banner indicate that the two photos have been assembled, and that it is consequently a photoshop job.

Les ajouts faisant croire à un reportage de BFMTV mis en évidence par le logiciel InVid Verify
Les ajouts faisant croire à un reportage de BFMTV mis en évidence par le logiciel InVid Verify © Observateurs InVid Verify



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